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Platform Safety & Modular Access Platforms

After falling 30 feet to the ground from a wooded two tiered work platform a master stonemason died.  Platform safety is very important and handmade platforms can be especially dangerous to workers.  The platform was fabricated by the victim and another employee and attached to the forks of a powered industrial truck.

The accident occurred when the victim was preparing to exit the platform.  At the time, the front guardrails were not in place and the worker was not wearing any type of fall protection.  There were no platform safety procedures in place such as three point contact or 100 percent tie-off.  It is not clear how the victim lost his balance or fell as the other employee did not have a clear view from ground level.  He saw a paintbrush fall then the worker right after.  He was pronounced dead a a local hospital from severe head and upper body injuries.

You can read the full FACE report here.Platform Safety

Safe Practices for Platform Safety

  • Strictly follow the manufacturer’s instructions on proper usage of powered industrial trucks and never use any PITs as man-lifts or equip them with any form of personnel work platform, if they are not so designed.
  • Ensure PITs are not modified or authorized to be modified in any way.
  • Perform a hazard assessment before beginning any work that involves material movement and the lifting of workers.
  • Develop and implement a fall protection plan
  • Require all workers who operate PITs to receive training, and ensure they are certified to operate the machinery.
  • Establish an enforcement policy for all employees that states work practices are expected to be performed in a manner consistent with applicable ANSI regulations, OSHA standards, and company health and safety policies.

Modular Access Platforms

Now available from Fall Protection Systems are the ErectaStep Modular Access Platforms.  The MP Series (Mobile Work Platform) gives our customers the work space of a fixed platform with the benefit of mobility.  This system is a highly  mobile work platform that is designed to bring the user to their level of work with an unparalleled level of confidence and safety.

The mobile work platform is constructed of lightweight aluminum with powder coated handrails.  It has full size 45 degree rise stair stringers in standard width and depth to meet OSHA specifications.  The single user maneuverability ensure that the MP will be a favorite and undoubtedly the “go-to” workhorse of any facility.  Download the drawing here.

Why Buy ErectaStep Modular Access Platforms?

  1. Completely Universal – design for your custom needs – allows for unites to be re-purposed later in other configurations.
  2. Pre-engineered Components – you save on custom engineering costs.
  3. Safety Compliance Built into the Product – lowers your risk of ownership and increases safety.
  4. Costs less than custom fabrication.
  5. In stock and ready to ship!
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Summer Fall Protection – Stay Safe This Summer

Warmer weather means increased outdoor worker activity.  With higher worker activity there is a greater chance for falls in the workplace.  Summer fall protection is an important consideration to make that will keep your workers safe.

What is Fall Protection?

Fall protection describes anything that controls the risk of a fall.  For example, employers must be aware of fall hazards in a worksite and must eliminate them or use fall protection to control exposure to them.  Employees are responsible for following the procedures and mandates set forth by the employer.

According to OSHA fall protection is:

  • Enforcing and following safe work procedures and practices
  • Motivating employees to report fall hazards to management
  • Managers who are committed to identifying and eliminating fall hazards
  • Training employees to recognize fall hazards and to use fall-protection equipment properly
  • Reviewing fall-protection procedures to ensure they’re effective

They have further identified the difference between hazardous work areas and hazardous tasks.  Hazard work areas are holes in floors & roofs, hoist areas, runways, excavations, wall openings, unprotected roof edges, and slippery or unstable surfaces.  Hazardous tasks include working on scaffolds, concrete forms, placing rebar, overhead bricklaying, working on steel beams, erecting exterior walls, and working on roofs.

Safe Practices Keep Workers Safe

In construction work, if you are elevated at 6 feet or higher and exposed to a fall hazard you are required to have fall protection.  This can be guardrails, safety nets, or a personal fall arrest system.  In cases of residential construction tasks you are required fall protection at 10 feet.  Many people don’t consider less than 10 feet much of a hazard but according to OSHA it accounts for about 70 percent of the accepted disabling claims made by Oregon workers that are injured by falls.  See the image below.  summer fall protection

Summer Fall Protection

Add in the element of extreme heat and summer fall protection is very important.  Learn more about working safely in summertime heat and protecting yourself with the OSHA Heat Safety Tool.

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Fall Protection Self Inspection Checklist

Want to see how you stack up with regards to fall protection?  Here is an example of a fall protection self inspection checklist that can be performed by a competent person at your work site.  This checklist covers regulations issues by the United States Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) under the construction standards 29 CFR 1926.501 to 1926.503.Fall Protection Self Inspection Checklist

fall-protection-part-1-cklst

Fall Protection Self Inspection Checklist

  1. Do walking and working surfaces have the strength and structural integrity to support people safely? [29 CFR 1926.501(a)(2)]
  2. Are employees prohibited from working on walking and working surfaces that cannot support them safely?  [29 CFR 1926.501(a)(2)]
  3. If fall protection systems are required, are they installed before employees begin work?
  4. Do guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems protect employees when they work on unprotected sides and edges of walking and working surfaces that are 6 feet or more above a lower level? [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(1)]
  5. Do guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems protect employees during construction of leading edges 6 feet or more above lower levels? [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(2)(i)]  *Note: Exceptions are permitted if these systems are infeasible or create a greater hazard. However, a fall protection plan must still be developed and implemented
  6. Do guardrail systems or personal fall arrest systems protect employees in a hoist area from falling 6 feet or more to lower levels?  [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(3)]
  7. Does a personal fall arrest system protect employees if guardrail systems are removed for hoisting operations, requiring employees to lean through the access opening or out over the edge of the access opening (e.g., to receive or guide equipment and materials)?  [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(3)]
  8. Do personal fall arrest systems, covers, or guardrail systems erected around holes protect employees on walking and working surfaces more than 6 feet above lower levels from falling through holes (including skylights)? [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(4)(i)]
  9. Do covers protect employees on a walking and working surface from tripping in or stepping into holes (including skylights)?  [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(4)(ii)]
  10. Do covers protect employees on a walking and working surface from objects falling through holes (including skylights)?  [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(4)(iii)]
  11. Do personal fall arrest systems, safety net systems, or positioning device systems protect employees on the face of formwork or reinforcing steel from falling 6 feet or more to lower levels? [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(5)]
  12. Do guardrail systems protect employees on ramps, runways, and other walkways from falling 6 feet or more to lower levels?  [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(6)]
  13. Do guardrail systems, fences, or barricades protect employees from falling at the edge of an excavation 6 feet or more in depth when the excavation is blocked because of plant growth or other visual barrier?  [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(7)(i)]
  14. Do guardrail systems, fences, barricades, or covers protect employees from falling at the edge of a well, pit, shaft, and similar excavation 6 feet or more in depth? [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(7)(ii)]
  15. Do guardrail systems or equipment guards protect employees from falling from less than 6 feet onto dangerous equipment?  [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(8)(i)]
  16. Do guardrail systems, personal fall arrest systems, or safety net systems protect employees 6 feet or more above dangerous equipment from fall hazards? [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(8)(ii)]
  17. Do guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems protect employees from falling while they perform overhand bricklaying and related work 6 feet or more above lower levels? Or, are employees restricted to working in a controlled-access zone?  [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(9)(i)]  **Note: Exceptions are permitted if these systems are infeasible or create a greater hazard. However, a fall protection plan must still be developed and implemented.
  18. Does a guardrail system, safety net system, or personal fall arrest system protect employees reaching more than 10 inches below the level of the walking and working surface?
    [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(9)(ii)]
  19. Does one of the following systems protect employees from falling while they work on low-slope roofs with unprotected sides and edges 6 feet or more above lower levels? (a) guardrail systems, (b) safety net systems, (c) personal fall arrest systems, (c) a combination warning line system and safety net system, (d) warning line system and
    personal fall arrest system, or (e) warning line system and safety monitoring system. [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(10)]  **Note: Exceptions are permitted if these systems are infeasible or create a greater hazard. However, a fall protection plan must still be developed and implemented. On roofs 50-feet or less in width, using a safety-monitoring system alone [i.e., without the warning line system] is also permitted. (See Appendix A to Subpart M–Determining Roof Widths of 29 CFR 1926 for help.)
  20. Do guardrail systems with toeboards, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems protect employees from falls off a steep roof with unprotected sides and edges 6 feet or more above lower levels?  [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(11)]
  21. Do guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems protect employees 6 feet or more above lower levels when they are engaged in erecting precast concrete members and related operations?  [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(12)]  **Note: Exceptions are permitted if these systems are infeasible or create a greater hazard. However, a fall protection plan must still be developed and implemented.
  22. Do guardrail systems, safety net systems, or personal fall arrest systems protect employees who are engaged in residential construction activities 6 feet or more above lower levels? [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(13)  **Note: Exceptions are permitted if these systems are infeasible or create a greater hazard. However, a fall protection plan must still be developed and implemented.
  23. Are employees protected from falling by a guardrail system, a safety net system, or a personal fall arrest system if they are working on, at, above, or near wall openings (including those with chutes attached) where (a) the outside bottom edge of the wall opening is 6 feet or more above lower levels, and (b) the inside bottom edge of the wall
    opening is less than 39 inches above the walking and working surface?  [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(14)]
  24. Does a guardrail system, safety net system, or personal fall arrest system protect employees on a walking or working surface 6 feet or more above lower levels that have not been addressed as part of this checklist? [29 CFR 1926.501(b)(15)]
  25. When an employee is exposed to falling objects, are they required to wear a hard hat? [29 CFR 1926.501(c)]
    1. When an employee is exposed to falling objects, is one of the following measures implemented? [29 CFR 1926.501(c)]
      1. Erect toeboards, screens, or guardrail systems to prevent objects from falling from higher levels.
      2. Erect a canopy structure and keep potential fall objects far enough away from the edge of the higher level so that those objects would not go over the edge if they were displaced.
      3. Barricade the area to which objects could fall, prohibit employees and students from entering the barricaded area, and keep objects that may fall far enough away from the edge of a higher level so that those objects would not go over the edge if they were displaced.
  26. Has a training program been provided to everyone who might be exposed to fall hazards? [29 CFR 1926.503(a)(1)]  **Note: The training program must enable each employee to recognize the hazards of falling and know the procedures for minimizing these hazards.
  27. Is the training program conducted by a competent person?  [29 CFR 1926.503(a)(2)]
  28. Have individual certification records been prepared that contain the name or other identity of the person trained, the date(s) of the training, and the
    signature of the employer or person who conducted the training?  [29 CFR 1926.503(b)(1)]
  29. Is the latest training certification for all persons trained available for inspection? [29 CFR 1926.503(b)(2)]
  30. Is retraining conducted if a person can no longer recognize the hazards of falling or follow the proper procedures? [29 CFR 1926.503(c)]
  31. Is retraining conducted when changes in the workplace render previous training obsolete? [29 CFR 1926.503(c)(1)]
  32. Is retraining conducted when changes in the types of fall protection systems or equipment render previous training obsolete?  [29 CFR 1926.503(c)(2)]
  33. Is retraining conducted if a person cannot use fall protection systems or equipment or has not retained the requisite understanding or skill?  [29 CFR 1926.503(c)(3)]
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FPS at ASSE Safety 2017 Expo

This week in Denver, Colorado Fall Protection Systems is participating and exhibiting in the ASSE Safety 2017 Expo.  We are happy to be included in this group of safety minded individuals that are committed to safety excellence.  Stop by booth #1850 to speak with our highly trained fall protection safety experts.  From product demonstrations to simple Q & A we are available to help keep your employee’s safe and OSHA compliant.

ASSE Safety 2017 Expo

Download the Floor Plan & Map here.

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Elevated Platform Fall Caused Fatality

It was just over two years ago that an elevated platform fall led to the death of a maintenance technician.  Case report #15KY011 was issued by the Kentucky Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Program.  The worker leaned through a railing on the side of a vertical I beam while trying to change a micro switch.  At the time, the overhead crane system was still active.

The worker was facing away from the crane and while attempting to change the switch the crane struck his right hand and caused him to fall 10 feet to the conveyor system below.  Another maintenance technician saw the victim fall.  He quickly contacted the in house medical responders who assessed the injured worker while calling for an ambulance.

Unfortunately, the victim died in the ambulance while being transported to the hospital to receive medical care.  His death was caused by multiple blunt force injuries and mechanical asphyxia sustained during the fall from height.

Elevated Platform Fall

Incident Scene – Crow’s nest where the worker was standing

Timeline

The exact time of the fall has not been determined, but the call for the ambulance was placed at 8:54 pm.  The ambulance arrived at 9:04 pm, and the time of death was 9:41 pm.

Elevated Platform Fall Prevention

Falls in the workplace can be prevented.  Here are some tips to prevent this type of accident from happening:

  • Employers should ensure their workers are following lockout/tagout policies at all times.
  • Employers should ensure fall protection is worn when working at height on equipment.
  • Employers should ensure all walk areas 4 feet or higher are guarded by railings on all sides.
  • A pre-hazard job analysis should be conducted before beginning work.

Employer & Training

The employer was an auto & truck parts manufacturer that specialized in truck and auto framework and part manufacturing.  With 1,200 employees the business had been in business since 2004.  It was discovered during a later investigation that the employer did have safety policies written and training.  However, the lock out tag out procedures to prevent this type of accident from occurring were not enforced or applied to the overhead crane.

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Get The OSHA Heat Safety Tool

Beat the heat this summer with a little help from the OSHA Heat Safety Tool.  This mobile app can be installed directly to your cell phone and uses temperature and humidity to measure the heat index value.  This app works great as a resource for outdoor workers that exposed to brutal summer heat.

“With the hot summer months on our doorstep, this app is a valuable tool for employers and workers to help prevent heat-related illnesses,” NIOSH Director John Howard said in a June 7 press release. “In many cases, workers rely on their employers to provide opportunities for taking rest breaks and drinking water. This app puts lifesaving information at the fingertips of both supervisors and workers to inform them when they need to take precautions to stay safe at the worksite.”

OSHA Heat Safety Tool

OSHA Heat Safety Tool – How Does It Work?

With the use of geolocation technology to asses both the current heat index, and provides a risk level.  It can also forecast the heat index for the rest of the workday.  The app also provides specific user recommendations to stay safe based on the levels reported.

Statistics provided by OSHA show that extreme heat exposure is the leading cause of death with regards to weather related hazards.  There are over 65,000 reported trips to the emergency room a year due to heat exposure.  In 2014, excessive heat caused 18 deaths from heat stroke and other heat related issues.

These are preventative measures recommended by NIOSH to keep workers safe:

  • Limit the time of exposure to heat and increase the recovery time in cool conditions
  • Provide plenty of cool water and allow for frequent breaks
  • Assign more workers to tasks during heat to compensate for breaks
  • Educate workers on the importance of heat safety

OSHA Heat Safety Tool

Get the App on Your Device!

Apple download here.

Android download here.

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OSHA Compliant Guardrail Systems

Workers on construction sites that are exposed to vertical drops of 6 feet or more require fall protection.  OSHA compliant guardrail systems, safety nets, or personal fall arrest systems for each employee are often the answer.  It is at the employer’s discretion to decide which preventative action makes the most sense.  Depending upon the work being performed, longevity of the work site, and location of the hazard all play a role in which type of system to use.  Guardrails are often used around roof edges, skylights, hatches, loading docks, mezzanines, elevated platforms, and for construction site safety.

osha compliant guardrail systems

 

OSHA Compliant Guardrail Systems Requirements

If OSHA Compliant Guardrail Systems are utilized the following provisions must be met:

  • Top edge height of top rails, or equivalent guardrail system members, must be between 39 and 45 inches above the walking/working level, except when conditions warrant otherwise and all other criteria are met (e.g., when employees are using stilts, the top edge height of the top rail must be increased by an amount equal the height of the stilts).
  • Midrails, screens, mesh, intermediate vertical members, or equivalent intermediate structures, must be installed between the top edge and the walking/working surface when there is no wall or other structure at least 21 inches high.
    • Midrails must be midway between the top edge of the guardrail system and the walking/working level.
    • Screens and mesh must extend from the top rail to the walking/working level, and along the entire opening between rail supports.
    • Intermediate members (such as balasters) between posts must be no more than 19 inches apart.
    • Other structural members (such as additional midrails or architectural panels) must be installed so as to leave no openings wider than 19 inches.
  • Guardrail systems must be capable of withstanding at least 200 pounds of force applied within 2 inches of the top edge, in any direction and at any point along the edge, and without causing the top edge of the guardrail to deflect downward to a height less than 39 inches above the walking/working level.
  • Midrails, screens, mesh, and other intermediate members must be capable of withstanding at least 150 pounds of force applied in any direction at any point along the midrail or other member.
  • Guardrail systems must not have rough or jagged surfaces that would cause punctures, lacerations, or snagged clothing.
  • Top rails and midrails must not cause a projection hazard by overhanging the terminal posts.

Guardrail System Types

Guardrail systems are available in 3 different styles such as non-penetrating guardrails, fixed base guardrails, and portable guardrails.

Non-Penetrating Guardrails

As their name describes, non-penetrating guardrails are installed without penetrating or making holes to the mounting surface.  These base systems are easily assembled and disassembled.

Fixed Base Guardrails

Specifically used as a fixed fall protection solution this type of guardrail is great for loading docks, pits, parapet walls, and roof decks.  Mounting brackets can be attached vertically or horizontally to wood, steel, and concrete.

Portable Construction Guardrail

Portable construction guardrail systems are lighter weight and more easily transported than steel or aluminum rail systems.  They are often used on flat, parapet or overhanging roofs.  The anchors easily clamp to braces for quick installation and are designed for used with standard wood 2 x 4’s for easy jobsite management.

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OSHA Cites Contractors in Southern Florida

OSHA cites contractors in Florida after a worker fell through an unprotected floor opening and died.  In addition to the citation, OSHA proposes $91,000 in fines.

Leonardo Javier Lopez-Montelo a 33 year old laborer fell nearly 11 feet through an unprotected stairway opening while working on a housing complex construction site in Miami.  Upon an investigation by the US Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration they found that the stairway opening had no guardrails or cover as required by law.  To make matters worse, OSHA discovered that the employer was aware of the unprotected hazard.

OSHA issued eight citations as a result of the fatality.  Southern Chills Inc., Capri Construction Corp., SB Painting & Waterproofing Inc., and Brothers Carpentry Corp for safety violations as they were all working on the same job site.  “This was a preventable incident.  Capri and Southern Chills failed in their responsibility to protect their employees and chose to ignore the need to install the necessary fall protection system which would have saved Leonardo,” said Condell Eastmond, OSHA’s area director in Fort Lauderdale.

OSHA Cites Contractors

Southern Chills was issued two repeated citations for failing to protect workers from falls up to 11 feet with a guardrail or personal fall system and not training employees to recognize fall hazards or procedures while working at elevated levels.

Capri, SB Painting, and Brother’s Carpentry were also issued serious citations for failing to protect workers from fall hazards with a guardrail or personal fall arrest system.  SB Painting and Brothers were also cited for not training workers to recognize fall hazards while working at elevated levels, and cited Capri for exposing workers to fall hazards due to a lack of frequent inspections to ensure hazardous conditions did not exist or were corrected. OSHA Cites Contractors

Fall Protection as an Investment

In the wake of this tragedy safety in the workplace cannot be stressed enough.  With a different approach to safety and an investment in creating a safety consciousness environment Leonardo would still be alive today.  The lives of workers are well worth the investment of fall protection and safety training.  In the event of an accident or death the costs well exceed the investment in fall protection.

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OSHA Inspection Preparation

Do you know what to expect from an OSHA inspection?  This blog post will help you with OSHA inspection preparation for your organization.  Inspections typically occur after a complaint is filed or if an accident occurs in the workplace.  Here is what you need to know to understand what to expect.  OSHA inspections are comprised of 3 parts; an opening conference, a walk around of all or part of the workplace, and a closing conference.  Depending upon the size of your workplace an inspection can take hours or several weeks to complete.

osha inspection preparationOpening Conference

The day of the inspection, the inspector will first meet with representatives of management and representatives of employee’s (if there are any).  The purpose of the inspection will be identified and will be kept as brief as possible.  If they are following up on a complaint, the inspector will make sure that the inspection addresses those hazards.  If for any reason management or employee’s object to a joint conference, there can be two separate opening conferences.

Before the inspection and after the opening conference, the inspector will check the OSHA required Log and Summary of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses and may choose to examine other OSHA records.

Walk Around

After the opening conference the inspector will check the safety or health hazards.  Anything that may have been included in a complaint will be reviewed.  The inspector has the authority to expand the inspection to cover the entire workplace if they deem it appropriate or necessary.  The inspector will need to talk to affected employee’s so employers will want to inform co-workers that there is an inspection in progress.  Anything discussed with the inspector will be done privately and confidentially.  It may also be appropriate for inspectors to interview workers outside the work site.

The purpose of the inspector is to identify apparent violations and bring them to the attention of the employer and employee representatives when they are documented.  If the inspector feels that site conditions were modified in preparation for the inspection, they may come back at another time for additional inspections.  If they do not observe the conditions in a filed complaint, they will ask the employees to explain how they are typically exposed to hazards or unsafe conditions.

If the inspector uses any equipment to measure hazards, watch the tests being performed.  If you have questions about the tests or what they are doing, ask questions.  You may also request summaries of the reports and OSHA must comply.  Take notes as to what is tested to be sure you receive all the results.

Closing Conference

It is a requirement for the inspector to conduct a closing conference.  This can be held as one with employers and employees or they can be separated.  If there were sampling tests conducted there will be additional conferences with the test results.  Any violations observed will be discussed; measures that need to be taken to correct them will be addressed as well as any fines.

According to OSHA the inspector will also advise the employee representative that:

  • The employer must not discriminate against employees for health and safety activity.
  • If the employer contests an OSHA citation, the employees have a right to elect “party status” before the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission (an independent agency).
  • They must be notified by the employer if the employer files a notice of contest or a petition for modification of an abatement date.
  • They have a right to contest the time OSHA allows the employer for correcting a hazard. (Employees, unlike employers, cannot contest other aspects of the citation before the Review Commission). A contest must be in writing and must be filed within 15 working days after receipt of the citation.

OSHA Citations

If OSHA decides to issue a citation and fine to the employer they must do so within six months of the violation.  Copies of the citations will also be sent to employee representatives when applicable one day after they are issued to the employer.

OSHA Inspection Preparation

To learn more about OSHA inspection preparation or how to prepare your facility on how to pass an OSHA inspection with regards to fall protection, contact FPS at 888-596-5367.  Fall Protection Systems offers free onsite analysis to make sure that workers at height are safe from falls and injury.  Learn more about that process here.

 

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Suspension Trauma

Suspension trauma, otherwise known as orthostatic shock, harness hang syndrome, or orthostatic intolerance is caused by the human body being held upright without movement for a long period of time.  A prime example of this is a workers suspended in the air in a harness.  This can cause fatigue, hypoglycemia, hypothermia and in extreme cases traumatic brain injuries.

Suspension Trauma

Symptoms of Suspension Trauma

  • Pallor
  • Sweating
  • Shortness of breath
  • Blurred vision
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Hypertension
  • Numbness of the legs
  • Fainting
  • Death (lack of oxygen to the brain)

Prevention of Suspension Trauma

If a worker has become suspended in a harness and is still conscious, having something to stand on is helpful because it will allow them to use their leg muscles by pushing against it.  Doing this keeps the blood circulating back to the torso.  It is not recommended that they move their legs in midair.  Although this would keep blood moving from legs to the torso, but eventually if the person tires the legs will begin to pool the blood.

After rescue when someone has been suspended for a long period they should sit in the “W” position for at least 30 minutes.  This position is where the worker sits upright on the ground with their back straight and their legs bent keeping their knees in line with their chin.  By sitting this way they are allowing the pooled blood to flow from the legs and slowly be re-introduced back into the body and prevents reflow syndrome.  This helps your body filter the pooled blood better.

Plan Ahead

Simply having a fall protection system is not where safety ends.  It is imperative that all employees are made aware of a rescue & retrieval plan.  This set of procedures will help everyone understand the risks that are involved when a worker is suspended in a harness.  Furthermore, every harness that workers use should be equipped with suspension trauma straps or safety straps.  For a minimal investment, workers can utilize these straps should they ever become suspended in their harness.  Watch the video below to see how the straps work in conjunction with a safety harness.

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