BLOG
toll free: 888-596-5367

Category Archives: General Safety

Fall Protection Blog articles categorized by general safety.

OSHA Awarded $11.2 in Safety Grants

OSHA awarded $11.2 million in safety grants through the Susan Harwood federal safety and health training program. The grants will provide education and training programs to help workers and employers recognize serious workplace hazards, including the coronavirus, implement injury prevention measures and understand their rights and responsibilities under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. 

OSHA Awarded $11.2 in Safety Grants

The Susan Harwood Training Grants Program funds grants to nonprofit organizations, including community and faith-based groups, employer associations, labor unions, joint labor-management associations, colleges, and universities. Target trainees include small-business employers and underserved vulnerable workers in high-hazard industries. 

OSHA awarded 80 grants to conduct occupational safety and health training in urban and economically distressed areas. The 2020 Harwood grant awards also funded 12 targeted-topic training grants and four training and educational materials development grants on topics related to the coronavirus pandemic.

Many of the awards will at least partially fund fall prevention and protection training. Four awards were specifically targeted on the topic:

Brazilian Worker Center in Allston, MA – Awarded $135,000 to …
Continue Reading »


Find and Fix Hazards

OSHA’s Safe + Sound Week is an annual awareness event supporting their year-round campaign to encourage every workplace to have a safety and health program. One of the three core elements of the Safe + Sound program is to find and fix hazards.

Find and Fix Hazards

At the core of every effective safety and health program is a systematic process for identifying and controlling (finding and fixing) workplace hazards. Traditional approaches to finding and fixing workplace hazards are often reactive. Actions are taken only after a worker is injured or becomes sick, a new standard or regulation is published, or an outside inspection finds a problem that must be fixed. Finding and fixing hazards using a proactive approach, before they cause injury or illness, is far more effective.

Finding and fixing hazards in the workplace is an ongoing process that helps better identify and control sources of potential injuries or illnesses. There are a variety of ways to keep the workplace safe, including establishing procedures to collect and review information about known or potential …
Continue Reading »


ASSP Virtual Safety Courses

With many occupational safety and health professionals working from home or otherwise restricted from travel, continuing education opportunities can be sparse. The American Society of Safety Professionals (ASSP) announced the launch of virtual safety courses as an expansion of the Society’s annual SafetyFOCUS education event. The ASSP virtual safety courses will connect safety professionals with industry experts who will share the latest knowledge and strategies on a convenient digital platform.

ASSP Virtual Safety Courses

“Throughout the pandemic, ASSP has adapted to this new normal and is working diligently to support the safety and health profession in new ways,” said ASSP President Deborah Roy, M.P.H., RN, COHN-S, CSP, CIT, FASSP, FAAOHN. “We will continue this valuable work given the vast potential and reach of virtual events.”

ASSP will launch its virtual safety education series on Aug. 26-27 with SafetyFOCUS: Construction, putting participants at the forefront of topics such as fall protection, silica standards, crisis management, contractor prequalification and job hazard analysis. Construction has one of the highest injury and fatality rates of any industry sector.

The virtual education series will deliver …
Continue Reading »


Workplace Falls Cost $15.4 Billion

Two of the top ten most costly causes of workplace injuries and illnesses on the annual Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index are related to falls. Workplace falls cost $15.4 billion annually and U.S. companies lose more than $1 billion per week due to non-fatal injuries.

Workplace Falls Cost $15.4 Billion

The annual study documents the top 10 causes of the most serious workplace injuries (based on events causing an employee to miss more than five days of work) and ranks by total workers compensation costs including medical and lost-wage payments. Data is used from Liberty Mutual, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), and the National Academy of Social Insurance. To capture accurate injury cost data, each index is based on data three years prior.

In the construction industry, falls to a lower level are the leading cause of workplace injury and lead direct costs. In non-fatal claims with more than five days away from work, falls (to a lower level and on the same level) cost $3.85 billion and account for 39% of total non-fatal injury and illness costs. …
Continue Reading »


Remain in Compliance When Reopening

Most workers are returning to facilities with modified operations and possibly new personal protective equipment (PPE). Especially in operations deemed as essential, pace has increased and in virtually all businesses pressure has mounted. The combination of modified and new operations, added pressure, and quickened pace leads to increased accidents. OSHA requires that employers must ensure their workers are protected with the appropriate hazard controls and PPE regardless of circumstances so it is critical to remain in compliance when reopening businesses.

Remain in Compliance When Reopening

RESOLVE HAZARDS

Fall-related injuries and fatalities are a leading threat to worker safety but preventable with proper fall protection and prevention equipment solutions. Solutions to remove these fall hazards range from quick fixes to custom-engineered solutions, but you can make progress to resolve all fall hazards now.

  • Properly fitted PPE
  • Guardrails and Safety Gates
  • Safe Access, Platforms, and Gangways
  • Ladder Fall Protection
  • Portable Fall Protection
  • Overhead Fall Protection

INSPECTIONS

If returning to operations that include fall protection equipment, make sure the following components of those systems are inspected:

10 Steps to Build Safe Workplaces

Preventing workplace injuries, illnesses, and deaths is the priority of employers and advocates nationwide and the focus of June as National Safety Month. There are many resources for improving safety culture and getting everyone invested in performing work safely. OSHA recommends 10 simple steps to build safe workplaces through safety and health programs.

10 Steps to Build Safe Workplaces

Set safety and health as a top priority. A strong safety culture means ensuring that everyone performs operations and finishes the day safely as the only acceptable way to do business.

Lead by example. Top-down, everyone is practicing safe behaviors and resolving hazards.

Implement a reporting system. Collaborate with representatives from all levels of your business to develop and implement a simple procedure for reporting any and all injuries, illnesses, incidents, hazards or safety and health concerns, including near misses. An anonymous reporting option should be available to help ease concerns of retaliation.

Provide Training. Train and re-train workers on how to identify and control hazards, how to safely perform operations, and how to properly use safety and …
Continue Reading »


Building Strong Safety Cultures

A key topic during this year’s National Safety Month is building strong safety cultures. Having a strong safety culture keeps everyone on your workforce engaged in keeping themselves and one another safe during operations. From the National Safety Council (NSC), here are tips for talking safety:

Building Strong Safety Cultures

Retire the ‘safety police’. The ‘gotcha’ approach is counterproductive, experts say. When workers feel they’re being policed, they find ways to hide their unsafe behaviors, resulting in lost opportunities for improvement. To make a genuine, long-term impact, take a persuasive approach rather than a punitive one.

Speak the worker’s language. Instead of presenting the information in the way that makes the most sense to the speaker, consider how the worker will receive it. Before saying anything, take a moment to think about who is being spoken to and what he or she cares about, and tailor the conversation to speak to those motivations. And remember: good communication goes both ways. Instead of doing all the talking, listen to what workers have to say – especially any questions or objections …
Continue Reading »


$11.5M Available in Worker Safety Grants

WASHINGTON, DC – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced the availability of $11.5 million in Susan Harwood Training Grants for nonprofit organizations, including community and faith-based organizations, employer associations, labor unions, joint labor/management associations, Indian tribes, and colleges and universities.

$11.5M Available in Worker Safety Grants

The Harwood Training Grant program supports in-person, hands-on training for workers and employers in small businesses; industries with high injury, illness, and fatality rates; and vulnerable workers, who are underserved, have limited English proficiency, or are temporary workers. The grants will fund training and education to help workers and employers identify and prevent workplace safety and health hazards, including the coronavirus, through the following funding opportunities categories:

  • Targeted Topic Training grants support educational programs that address identifying and preventing workplace hazards. These grants require applicants to conduct training on OSHA-designated workplace safety and health hazards;
  • Training and Educational Materials Development grants support the development of quality classroom-ready training and educational materials that focus on identifying and preventing workplace hazards; and
  • Capacity Building grants support organizations in developing new capacity for conducting workplace …
    Continue Reading »

National Safety Month June 2020

The National Safety Council (NSC) remains dedicated to eliminating the leading causes of preventable death and injury occurring on the job and beyond. National Safety Month scheduled for June 2020 will continue as it is more critical than ever to provide resources for employers and the workforce amid global operation adjustments.

National Safety Month June 2020

This month, the NSC unveils a new look, updated resources, and a renewed commitment to be America’s safety advocate. Creating a culture of safety in every workplace will be supported with new initiatives including redesigned in-person training courses that can be consumed virtually.

Rather than focusing on a single topic each week as in years past, the NSC will be providing real-time, relevant resources on a variety of topics for keeping workers safe in our evolving workplaces. National Safety Month’s public materials will include posters, tip sheets, articles, social media graphics, and more. If you are an NSC member, your additional resources include 5-Minute Safety talks, additional posters, videos, and more.

The NSC is America’s leading nonprofit safety advocate focused on …
Continue Reading »


Keep Harnesses and Lanyards Clean

Safety on the job has never been more critical. Adding on to OSHA and ANSI standards and regulations, workers are being asked to wear masks and gloves, maintain distancing from one another, and keep their gear and worksites as clean as possible. If your work requires you to be connected to a fall protection system, here are guidelines on how you can keep your harnesses and lanyards clean.

Keep Harnesses and Lanyards Clean

The first thing to know is that common disinfectants, like Lysol, should NOT be used. Most harnesses and lanyards are made of porous synthetic materials and when exposed to the chemicals found in disinfectants may degrade and no longer meet their original design and strength requirements. Secondly, high-powered commercial washing or steamers should not be used due to the potential damage to the web fibers.

Hand scrubbing or top/side loading agitating-style washing machines are acceptable for cleaning harnesses and lanyards. If using a machine, the harness or lanyard should be placed in a mesh laundry bag to prevent tangling.